Different Levels And Classes Of Polished Concrete Flooring

When improving establishments, one of the most important item individuals need to enhance is their floors. Of course, there are numerous flooring solutions that can complement your establishments. Not to mention, flooring solutions can also help you ensure that you can improve the appeal of your homes.

When it comes to such solutions, more and more individuals are opting for polished concrete flooring due to its durability. In addition, this type of flooring is easy to maintain. However, individuals need to be aware that there are different levels and classes of polished concrete flooring. Experts classify finished gloss levels in ranges from 1 through 4 and aggregate exposures as A, B, C or D, depending on the degree of exposure. To know more, below is a brief description of the levels and classes of polished concrete flooring.

Gloss levels

Level 1

Level 1 or the flat ground polish can be obtained by making use of 100-grit resin bond or below. With this, the floor will appear a bit hazy with little or no clarity or reflection.

Level 2

Level 2 or satin polish can be obtained by stopping at the 400-grit resin bond. With this, it produces a low-sheen finish which create a low-luster matte finish.

Level 3

Level 3 also known as a semi-polished flooring is achieved by going up to an 800-grit or higher diamond abrasive. Because of this, the floor surface will have a much higher sheen than that of level 2 finish. And, individuals will start to see good light reflectivity.

Level 4

Level 4 also known as the highly polished flooring produces a high degree of shine. As a result, when you standing directly over the surface, you can see your reflection with total clarity. Other than that, the floor appears to be wet when viewed from different vantage points. There are different ways to achieve a level 4 flooring. For one, individuals can use a 3,000-grit resin-bond diamond. Or perhaps, individuals can use a high-speed burnisher outfitted with specialty buffing pads.

Aggregate exposure classes

With regard to aggregate exposure classes, individuals can identify its class by checking floor surface.

Class A

Class A features a cream exposure. And, individuals can also notice some blemishes and imperfections.

Class B

A Class B features a fine aggregate also known as a salt and pepper finish.

Class C

A Class C has a medium aggregate exposure where individuals can notice little or no large aggregate exposure at random locations.

Class D

A Class D features a large aggregate with little or no fine aggregate exposure.

Knowing all these can help individuals find the best level and aggregate exposure of polished concrete flooring that can match their establishments and needs.

What Is The Best Flooring For Your Kitchen?

Some of the things to consider in a floor for the kitchen are the type of incidents and traffic that occur in a kitchen. There are some types of flooring that would not fare well in the kitchen arena. Kitchen floors deal with dropped eggs, spilled liquids, and other various messes.

One option is the hand-scraped, grooved, and other distressed flooring can be much more than just a statement of style. These types of flooring can help hide dings from jars hitting the floor as well as blending in with the general wear and tear a kitchen floor takes. There are styles that make it possible to easily do your own kitchen floor renovation because they can be clicked together and “float” in place without any nailing or gluing.

In looking at flooring, it is beneficial to have a kitchen floor that is slip resistant. It is important to also have a surface in the kitchen that is resistant to stains and scratches. If you have babies around, or are planning a family in the future, you may not want to choose vinyl for your kitchen floor. While some vinyl flooring emits relatively few volatile organic compounds (VOCs) there is still concern due to health issues and pollution where vinyl is concerned.

Stone or tile works very well in heavy traffic areas of the home, such as the kitchen. One of the most durable tiles is ceramic, which comes in various colors and styles. Ceramic tiles also have lots of options that can be sued for decorative designs and/or borders.

If you want to use limestone, remember it is a porous stone and must be sealed upon installation and then twice a year. Limestone is a natural stone and offers an Old World look to it, however, if the maintenance for it is not something you want to undertake, I would suggest finding another flooring material for your kitchen.

Wood is a great and popular choice for the floor in the kitchen. Upkeep is fairly minimal and it can create a wonderful warm look to your kitchen. You can match the color of the wood floor to the cabinets in the kitchen, or go for a lighter or darker shade compared to the cabinets. Wood flooring can be distressed as mentioned earlier, to help high the dings that may occur. Many of the pre-finished wood flooring options today can easily withstand heavy traffic and even water stains. There are also high-pressured plastic laminates which can be an alternative to the wood floor, but offer a similar look for less money.

Vinyl flooring can offer numerous styles and colors, either in tiles or sheets and is much less expensive. Cork is a versatile and durable material which is also available in various colors. Not only is it water-resistant, but can help reduce impact noise.

I would suggest that before putting in a kitchen floor, you take the time to research the different types of flooring as well as considering your budget. In doing the research for this article, hardwood flooring is by far the most popular choice for your kitchen floor and second place choice is ceramic tile.